What Really Makes A Better Breakfast?

Kylie Hollonds

It isn’t very surprising that a sugary snack isn’t as filling as a healthier alternative, but did you know that the same foods can differ in how satisfying they are, simply because you prepared them differently? Let’s look at breakfasts. Oatmeal is a classic – hearty, filling, and nutritious, it ticks all the boxes and can keep you satisfied for hours. If on Monday you ate a bowl of oatmeal and fruit, and on Tuesday you went with a quick and easy bowl of cereal, you’d feel the urge to start snacking much earlier than on Monday morning. 

What causes such discrepancies between two breakfasts of equal volume? The first culprit is sugar, which cereal – even a lot of those which purport to be healthy – is loaded with. When consumed, sugar is converted into glucose within minutes, which raises blood and heart pressure and increases mental awareness. Your taste receptors release feel-good hormones which provide the addictive sugar high, but these pleasant effects wear off quickly as the body begins to process the glucose in an attempt to eliminate it from the bloodstream, a process which results in the creation of insulin. However, insulin overproduction leads to low blood glucose, which causes mood swings, sudden energy slumps and negatively affected sleep, earning the name ‘sugar crash’. Imagine enduring this cycle every morning! No wonder you want a big lunch and plenty of snacks throughout your day.

The second factor is carbohydrates – the more overly processed the carb, the faster it is absorbed, which isn’t necessarily a good thing. For an example, let’s pit bread against spaghetti. Both are made from wheat and neither contain added sugar. It stands to reason, then, that consuming the same amount of calories of each would produce the same effect on the body, yes? No. The former is a higher-glycaemic food, while the latter is lower-glycaemic. Spaghetti, while undergoing a certain amount of processing, is at the end of the day a uniformly dense portion of wheat carbs, while bread contains many tiny air bubbles, which means the body can break it down much faster. So while the longer-to-digest spaghetti strands provide the body with a sustained, slow rose in blood sugar, the speedily broken-down bread provides a spike in blood sugar, which leads to an insulin spike and a ‘sugar crash’ – even though you didn’t consciously eat any sugar! This crash then drives the blood sugar levels down, triggering a hunger response, which then leads to the cravings and the ingestion of additional calories, and if more high-glycaemic foods are eaten, this leads to a vicious cycle.

 The end goal for any persons seeking to keep themselves full for longer, would be to actively consume foods that have been processed as little as possible, and contain little to no added sugar, encompassing most fresh fruits and vegetables, good sources of protein, and foods that are in as whole a state as possible. In carbohydrate form, this would be choosing brown rices, breads and wheat products, choosing wholegrain and high fibre labelled items, and eating smaller portions of dense, whole foods rather than large portions of finely processed foods. Oatmeal is perfect for this – a smaller portion is both lower in calories and carbohydrates, and yet will provide the body with such a sustained release of energy as to control insulin production, blood glucose levels, excess calorie intake, and provide the body with essential nutrients, making oats the perfect breakfast choice.

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The Inside Scoop on Organic Oats

Kylie Hollonds
The organic industry in Australia is currently worth $2.6 billion dollars and ever-growing! Find out more about Organic Oats here....

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❣️ GF Oats partner with Legacy Australia!

Kylie Hollonds
GF Oats have proudly teamed up with Legacy Australia to support their fundraising activities for Legacy Week and beyond...

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Can Oats really be Gluten Free?

Kylie Hollonds
There is a pervasive myth that oats cannot be gluten-free, but this cannot be further from the truth. Find out more here....

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All you need to know about our Oats - FAQ's

Kylie Hollonds
We have been importing and selling GF Oats to the public since 2009. Here we address our most frequently asked questions....

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What we can call gluten free and what we can't?

Kylie Hollonds

Gluten Free Labelling Laws in Australia

Here in Australia, you will see foods labelled as gluten free, gluten friendly and low gluten – What do these mean?

FSANZ’s is our labelling governing body here in Australia and their role is to protect the health and safety of people in Australia and New Zealand through the maintenance of safe food supply.  FSANZ stands for Food Safety Australia and New Zealand and is a strong independent body of experts on a panel, that has a partnership between the Commonwealth; Australian States and Territories; and New Zealand. One of the panellists includes a member of the Coeliac Society of Australia, representing those who have an allergy to gluten and are required to follow gluten free diets. 

FSANZ is responsible for developing, varying and reviewing standards and for developing codes of conduct with industry for food available in Australia and New Zealand covering labelling, composition and contaminants.  In Australia, FSANZ also develops food standards for food safety, maximum residue limits, primary production and processing and a range of other functions including the coordination of national food surveillance and recall systems, conducting research and assessing policies about imported food.

Australia & New Zealand labelling laws:

Our 2 countries are very tough when it comes to labelling laws and when you compare the laws here to other countries they are the toughest in the world.

Australia and New Zealand have the toughest labelling laws in the world; these have been set by the Australia New Zealand Food Standard's Code. This gives a great deal of confidence when choosing food for people with coeliac disease in Australia.

Gluten Free Labelling:  Foods labelled as “gluten free” must not contain any detectable gluten; and no oats or their products; or cereals containing gluten that have used malt or their products. Nil gluten equals <3ppm which is the lowest the machines can test down to.  In our online store, we can label our Honey as gluten free honey, we can label our soap as gluten free soap, but we are unable to label our oats as gluten free oats or our biscuits as gluten free biscuits, so we label them as gluten friendly.

Gluten Friendly is a term that is entering the market, seen on the menu’s around the country in restaurants, clubs & cafes. This is generally to protect the venues from any cross-contamination. The fact is unless you are eating at a dedicated gluten free venue, there is always a chance of cross-contamination. No matter how diligent the food prep is. In the case of GF Oats products, we are communicating that the product is safe for those avoiding gluten, not contaminated to gluten. This enables us to communicate our brand benefits to the customers who need us to comply with Food labelling guidelines.

Low gluten is another term you will see coined, however, the true definition of that is that the product tests to <20ppm. This is fine for people who are moderately sensitive to gluten. The difference between 3ppm and 20 seems small until you have an allergy to gluten, then this can make a difference. 

There is currently a study being conducted at the Monash University on oats, funded by the Coeliac Society, as part of the movements towards labelling uncontaminated oats as gluten free here Australia to avoid the confusion of being the only country in the world that doesn't make the label claim. 

Please refer to our FAQ's and Compliance Page for further clarification and study links. 

 

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GF Oats Compliance - Why trust us?

Kylie Hollonds

GK Gluten Free Foods are the largest Australian importers and suppliers of Uncontaminated oats or Gluten-Free Oats as it is referred to in other parts of the world, however, in Australia, a subclause in the labelling laws continues to prevent the labelling of any oats to be gluten-free.

GF Oats are the only brand in Australia, who import bulk oats from “Purity Protocol” growers around the world, who certify their oats as uncontaminated from the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley, and meet Australia’s strict gluten-free minimum testing guidelines.

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Australian and New Zealand Food Labelling Standards around Oats

Kylie Hollonds
In Australia, we are unable to label any product that contains oats as gluten-free oats. The Australian and NZ labelling laws restrict the use of the gluten-free oats claim until the results of an oat study are completed. Until then GF Oats test each load that comes into Australia and displays the results on their Compliance Page.

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GF Oats a member of the Purity Protocol - It Matters to our customers!

Kylie Hollonds
Gluten-free oats purity protocol was set up to ensure that customers were receiving pure oats that were not contaminated from the gluten found in wheat, rye and barley.

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GF Oats Partners with Legacy

Kylie Hollonds
In 2019 we launched our ANZAC biscuit just in time for ANZAC Day.  We were fortunate enough to meet a local manufacturer here in Toowoomba who saw our vision and their baker locked in on the challenge of perfecting this biscuit for me to meet all my crazy requirements. We are so proud of this biscuit and are excited to be selling the ANZAC biscuit Retail Packs, week on week across IGA and health food all around Australia. In 2020 we committed to introducing a snack pack for the convenience market to gain further reach and a Food Service pack.

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